The History of Signal Integrity Issues on PCBs
4 Stages of Problems/Solutions

Presenter: Douglas G. Brooks, Ph.D.


Presentation:

Presentation PDF

Meeting Minutes:

Abstract:

For some 50 years, the PCB was just a passive device. It was a place to mount the circuit's components and connect them together. Then, around the mid-90's for many of us, the PCB began to act like a component in its own right, causing its own set of signal integrity problems. Since then, these PCB problems have gone through several iterations as rise times continued to get faster and faster.

Doug Brooks likes to think of these iterations as four stages of development, each with its own unique problems and solutions. Come hear Doug summarize those stages, the underlying problems that occurred at each stage, and the solutions the industry has come up with for each stage. This will be like a mini-seminar on the entire topic of PCB signal integrity --- put on by a person who has been leading such seminars for over 20 years. We will cover topics such as EMI, crosstalk, ground bounce, controlled impedance traces, skin depth, dielectric losses, via impedance and via lengths, and learn that some of the solutions the industry has come up with for these problems are common to more than one problem.

Speaker Biography:

Doug Brooks was president of UltraCAD Design, Inc., from its founding in 1992 until he retired about three years ago. His educational background includes a BS/EE and MS/EE from Stanford and a PhD from the University of Washington. He has written two previous books on PCB Signal Integrity Issues and countless articles. He has been giving presentations on PCB design topics around the world for the past 20 years. Now that he has finished this book, he says that this might be his last presentation --- ever! We'll see!

Doug's books can be found HERE.

Date:

November 09th, 2016
6:00pm - 8:00pm

Registration:

Location:

Lake Washington Institute of Technology - Kirkland Campus
Room A102
11605 132nd Ave NE
Kirkland, WA 98034


Park in the south lot off of 132nd Ave NE. Room A102 is located in the south-east corner of the building, on the 1st floor.